Travel demand between Serbia and Russia is on the high rise in the last few months.

National airlines of two countries benchmarked exceptional cabin load factor, with air tickets price skyrocketing.

For example, if you seek a ticket from Belgrade to Moscow and be offered to pay 400 euros for one-way travel, which is insane, you can be happy to get such a bargain according to actual market trends. As we learned from the air ticket sale offices, it is primarily because of the high demand for point-to-point trips between Serbia and Russia and many Russian tourists heading to Montenegro’s Adriatic resorts via Belgrade.

As an answer to strong demand, Air Serbia introduced an additional flight from Belgrade to Moscow, eight per week in total since 5 June.

“We are glad to strengthen our presence in Russia, which is a very important market – both for Serbia and the region. Despite travel restrictions, we have increased the number of flights to Moscow, recommence flights to Saint Petersburg and Krasnodar, and even introduced a completely new route to Rostov-on-Don. Great demand and passenger load factor on the new route showed us that it was a good business decision. We will continue to monitor demand and adapt to the circumstances in the market quickly”, said Jiri Marek, General Manager Commercial and Strategy, Air Serbia.

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Aeroflot uses widebody planes for the Belgrade route

Since May, Russian Aeroflot introduced widebody planes on its popular route between Moscow Sheremetyevo and Belgrade Nikola Tesla airports. In the beginning, Aeroflot operated occasionally this route with Airbus A330 with 296 seat capacity and sometimes used to switch it with Boeing 777.

There are 16 weekly flights between Moscow and Belgrade, and seven of them are operated by widebody plane. Aside from eight Air Serbia’s and seven Aeroflot’s flights, there is one operated by the third airline, Russian Nordwind Airlines.

There are no available seats on flights to Tivat

At the same time, Air Serbia upgrades its timetable on Belgrade – Tivat route as a daily routine. On Thursday, 1 July, it will be four flights, on Saturday, 3 July, six, and on Sunday, seven flights between two cities. It’s almost impossible to catch the full timetable and be accurate at the same time, cause there are so many changes, with new flights being added in no time. In the first half of July, Air Serbia plans to fly to Tivat at least six times per day. If you try to buy a ticket for one of those flights, your wallet will come lighter by one hundred euros per one way at the end, at least.

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